Stem Stitch and Outline Stitch Tutorial

Stem stitch & Outline stitch
…..

Stem Stitch vs. Outline Stitch

It’s another day and another embroidery stitch tutorial. Let’s dive into the stem stitch and the outline stitch.

They both have a lovely twist, like a rope with a fairly consistent width. The stem stitch and outline stitch are great for outlines, creating stems for flowers, and curves. They create nice solid lines and they make a nice alternative to the chain stitch when I don’t want that chain look. Don’t get me wrong, I love the chain stitch but sometimes it’s not the look I’m after.

You can also use them to create fills, and if you take advantage of the direction of their twists and lay them next to each other just right you can create a texture with a chevron-like appearance which is just so magical! At least I think so!

They are among some basic stitches worth knowing, but they sometimes get mistaken for each other because of how similar they are. You’ll sometimes hear the stem stitch being referred to the outline stitch and vice versa, so I’ll try to help you distinguish the two.

While they’re considered a basic stitch we should know the word ‘basic’ might fool you a bit. They are simple to create but there is a bit more to them than meets the eye.

Stem stitch & Outline stitch
…..

They look very similar to each other, don’t they? But if you look a little closer you’ll see that they twist in different directions. It has to do with where your needle and working thread come up in relation to the line you’re creating, and… the direction you are creating your stitch.

I think in order for you to understand what I mean by that we should start by first learning the basics of how to create a stem stitch and an outline stitch. It will help you visualize things much better.

Starting with the Stem Stitch

We’ll go from left to right… this is important to remember. First, bring your needle up through your fabric.

red thread pulled through to top of hooped fabric
…..

Leave a small gap & push your needle to the back of your fabric. Leave a bit of loose thread on top and push it over to the bottom.

small loose stitch

Go back about 3/4 of a stitch length and come up halfway. Your needle should be above your loose thread like it is here. Remember, we’re working from left to right.

small loose stitch pulled down with needle coming up between the beginning and end
…..

Hold your needle in place & pull the rest of the thread through to the back.

tight stitch with a needle coming up above it
…..

Pull your needle through. Your working thread should be above your stitch.

thread pulled through
…..

Move up a stitch length & push your needle through your fabric. Again, leave a little bit of loose thread behind & push it over towards you below the line where your stitch is being created).

needle returning to back of fabric a gap away from 1st stitch
…..

Push your needle up through the end of the last stitch & repeat your steps until you’re happy with the length of your stitch.

needle coming up from the end of 1st stitch
…..
tightened stitch with needle pointing up from fabric from above the stitch
…..

To end your stitch, come up through your fabric & push your needle through the very end of your stitch.

end of the stem stitch
…..
needle returning to the back to end the stem stitch
…..
stem stitch
…..

And that was the stem stitch. Let’s now create the outline stitch.

The Outline Stitch

Just as you did with the stem stitch, come up to the top of your fabric, then back down a stitch length away. Remember to leave a little bit of loose thread behind, but this time, push your loose thread above your stitch line, so away from you.

loose stitch with thread pushed up
…..

Go back about half a stitch length and push your needle up halfway.

needle coming up between the two ends of a loose stitch that is pushed up
…..

Hold your needle and pull your thread through to the back. Your needle should be below your stitch line.

tightened stitch with needle pointing up from below the thread
…..

Pull your needle through then move up a stitch length and push it down to the back, again leaving a bit of loose thread behind.

needle returning to back a stitch length away
…..

Go back to the end of your last stitch and push your needle through halfway. Remember, your needle should be below your stitch.

needle coming up at the end of first stitch
…..

Repeat your steps. End your stitch just like we did with the stem stitch, by coming up to the top of your fabric then pushing your needle through the very end of your stitch.

needle coming up at the end of the outline stitch
…..
needle returning to the back at the end of outline stitch
…..

Now you now how to create an outline stitch. See how similar it is to the stem stitch?

Changing the Direction of Your Stitch

Now that you are familiar with the stem stitch and outline stitch you’ll need to know how to switch things up when you change the direction of your stitch line so your twists are consistent.

I created a little chart to help you with that as well as a little diagram below:

STEM STITCH

If you’re stitching from…

  • left to right: loose thread should be BELOW your needle & working thread.
  • bottom to top: loose thread should be to the RIGHT of your needle & working thread.
  • right to left: loose thread should be ABOVE your needle & working thread.
  • top to bottom: loose thread should be to the LEFT of your needle & working thread.

……….

OUTLINE STITCH

If you’re stitching from…

  • left to right: loose thread should be ABOVE your needle & working thread.
  • bottom to top: loose thread should be to the LEFT of your needle & working thread.
  • right to left: loose thread should be BELOW your needle & working thread.
  • top to bottom: loose thread should be to the RIGHT of your needle & working thread.

.

You can keep it straight by referring to my little illustration below:

two squares with hoops and a needle showing arrows for direction of stitch
…..
Here is how to read the illustration:

Imagine you are stitching two squares, one with the stem stitch & the other using the outline stitch.

  • The square represents your your stitch line.
  • The arrows represent the direction your stitches are being made.
  • The loops represent the loose thread which you saw in the step where we pushed our needle up through the fabric.
  • The needle will either be inside the box or on the outside of your box.

. . .

In the stem stitch:

  • We are going counter-clockwise.
  • The loops are always on the outside of your square (stitch line).
  • The needle is always towards the inside of your square.

So for example, if you are stitching along the bottom stitch line (going from left to right), then your loop (your loose thread) will be towards the bottom while your needle will be above it.

In the outline stitch:

  • We’re going counter-clockwise here as well.
  • The loops are always on the inside of your square (stitch line).
  • The needle is always towards the outside of your square.

In this example, if you are stitch along the bottom stitch line (going from left to right), then your loop (your loose thread) will be above your needle.

. . .

Stitch Challenge!

It’s always much easier to understand and remember things when you give it a try. So grab your embroidery supplies and stitch two squares. Use the stem stitch with one and the outline stitch with the other.

Do this a few times and you’ll master it in no time! You can always refer back to the illustration as well.

There are a few more things to mention before I go… thanks for sticking with me this far, btw!

When it comes to creating a curve or curved shape, you’ll end up with a much smoother result if your stitches are smaller. If your stitches are too large for your curve your line will no longer be nice and tight. Rather, it might look as though you had a few drinks while stitching! So keep them small.

Then there is this… we’ve focused on the the differences between the stem stitch and outline stitch, but to me, they’re practically the same stitch and can be used interchangeably. I’m sure someone out there might consider this embroidery blasphemy, but if you compare some of those lines you wouldn’t know which stitch it was.

For example, if you compare a stem stitch going from left to right to the outline stitch going right to left it will be very hard to distinguish which is which.

My point is, don’t get too hung up on which stitch to use as long as your stitches look consistent, meaning the twists of your stitch should look the same when you creating, say a leaf, for example. You might use a stem stitch on one side & perhaps an outline stitch on the other side, depending on the direction you’re working. As long as both sides look like they have the same stitch I don’t see why you couldn’t mix it up this way.

You should still know how to create both stitches however. It was incredibly confusing for me at first, and now that I understand them my advice is not to get too hung up on the details. However, I recognize the importance of knowing how to create them in all directions so I encourage you to learn. It will help you make some good decisions when deciding which stitch to use and when.

Continuing on about curves, sometimes, instead of creating smaller stitches to create a smoother curve just remember to push your needle up towards the inside of the curve so your thread will always be on the outside of the curve. I imagine the curve of the loose thread laying next to the curve of your stitch line to remember this. It doesn’t matter to me if it’s a stem stitch or outline stitch as long as my result looks good.

As always, I’ve included a video tutorial:

Once more, thanks for sticking with me through all of this. I hope you find this information helpful!

❤️ Happy stitching!

Pin Me!

Embroidery Stitch Tutorial: The Stem Stitch & Outline Stitch