5 Easy Feather Stitch Variations

Learn 5 Variations of the Feather Stitch!

I love embroidery stitches with versatility and the feather stitch is one of them! ❤️

I’ll show you how to create the feather stitch along parallel lines for the sake of simplicity but you can make them more organic by using curvy guidelines or even changing up the length of some of the ‘V’ shapes.

Create vines, foliage, and coral with the feather stitch. You can incorporate other stitches like the lazy daisy stitch, french knot, and even a whip stitch… there’s a lot of room to be creative!

It starts off like the fly stitch which uses the basic ‘V’ shape … you’ll see what I mean.

Here are the variations you’ll learn today:

I’ll start with the basic feather stitch, then I’ll show you how to vary it up 5 different ways. Let’s get started!

Variation 1: Basic Feather Stitch

If you look close, you’ll notice that the feather stitch looks like a bunch of letter V’s that are zig zagging from side to side . I’ll start on the right.

Create 4 parallel guide lines and come up at the top of line 2 (at A).

Return to the back at the top of line 4 (B) but keep the thread a bit loose on top. Then come up at C over your loose thread like this:

Once you pull your needle through it will look very much like you’re creating a fly stitch:

TIP: Something I like to do before I pull my needle through is to pull my thread from the back until it hugs my needle in the front. It’s optional but I think it makes the thread slide through more smoothly.

It’s time to repeat these steps towards the left side. Return to the back to the left of C, on line 1 (D). Remember to keep your thread a bit loose on top and come up at E, above your loose thread and pull it through.

Repeat your steps on the right, then left, and continue until you’re happy with the length.

When you’ve reached the end, tie your stitch down by creating a tiny stitch directly below your last ‘v’.

Variation 2: Closed Feather Stitch

With the closed feather stitch variation, the ‘V’ shapes still go from side to side, just like in the basic variation, only this time it’s at an angle.

Draw 2 parallel lines and create your first ‘V’.

Come up at the top of your 1st line, at A, then return to the back at the top of line 2, at B. Keep your thread a bit loose on top.

Then come up at C which is a stitch length away below A. Your needle should come up above your loose thread. Then gently pull your thread through to create your first ‘V’.

To make your next ‘V’, return to the back at the top of line 2, (at B) and again keep the thread loose on top.

Come up above your loose thread on line 2, at D . It should be lower than C. Then pull your thread through.

Repeat these steps until you’re happy with the length.

Variation 3: Straight Feather Stitch

In this feather stitch variation, the ‘V’ shapes are stacked on top of each other with one side of the ‘V’ being straight and the other angled.

Draw 2 parallel guidelines and come up at A, then down at B. Keep your thread slightly loose on top so when you come up at C (a stitch length away below B) you’ll be able to loop your thread over it like this:

Pull your thread through then return to the back a stitch length away below A (at D). Remember to keep your thread a bit loose on top.

Then come back up at E above your loose thread, then pull your thread through form your second ‘V’.

Repeat these steps until you’re happy with the length then add a small tie stitch at the very bottom to hold that last ‘V’ in place.

You can also create this variation going in the other direction using the same steps.

…And, you can even combine them by placing them directly next to each other which gives it the illusion the the center is braided.

Variation 4: Maidenhair

Draw 7 parallel lines. Line 4 will be the center line that each ‘V’ extends from.

Come up at the top of line 3 (at A) and return to the back at B. Keep your thread a bit loose on top. Come back up a stitch length away, below B (at C). Make sure it’s above your loose thread and pull it through.

Next, return to the back at line 2 (at D) slightly lower than A. Remember to keep your thread loose on top. Then come up at E, a stitch length below C, and again, it should be above your loose thread. Then pull it through.

Return to the back at F on line 1, slightly lower than D. Then come up a stitch length away, below E (at G), above your loose thread. Pull it through.

Now repeat these steps on the other side.

Repeat your steps until you’re happy! Add a small stitch to the bottom of your last ‘V’ to hold it in place.

Variation 5: Double Feather Stitch

The double feather stitch is created just like the basic feather stitch except you’ll create three ‘V’ shapes for each direction.

  • Start with 6 parallel guide lines and start at line 2.
  • Come up at A then return to the back at line 4 (at B).
  • Keep your thread a bit loose on top and come up at C, above your loose thread.
  • Then pull your thread through.

Create another to the right.

  • Return to the back at D (on line 5) and keep your thread loose on top.
  • Then come up at E, above your loose thread, and pull your thread through.

And do this one more time to the right. Return to the back at F, keeping the thread slightly loose on top. Then pull your thread through at G.

Now repeat these steps to create 3 more V’s, only this time towards the left.

So return to the back at H with your thread slightly loose on top. Come up above your loose thread, at I, and pull your thread through.

Return to the back at J and pull your needle through at K.

Create one more ‘V’, then switch directions. Continue in this manner until you’re happy, then tie down your last ‘V’ with a small stitch at the bottom.

Embroidery Video Tutorial

And there you have it! Enjoy the video tutorial! Enjoy!

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