10 Easy Blanket Stitch Variations

10 Blanket stitch variations on hooped fabric
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Here are 10 Fun Blanket Stitch Variations!

It’s time for another embroidery stitch tutorial so I’m going to over the blanket stitch which you might associate with sewing blanket edges, but you can use it to incorporate simple designs and embellishments into your embroidery work!

I’ll first show you how easy it is to create a basic blanket stitch, then I’ll cover 10 other variations!

The variations I’ll teach you are as follows:

Alright, let’s begin!

❤️ The Basic Blanket Stitch

First, come up at A, then return to the back at B and keep the thread slightly loose on top. If you were to pull the thread tightly you would have a diagonal.

Come back up to the top at C. Your thread should be looped around C so when you pull it tight you’ll be able to form a right angle:

Now, let’s repeat the same steps. Eeturn to the back at D & keep the thread slightly loose.

QUICK TIP: to keep your stitches nice and neat it can help to gently hold your thread down near C as you create your next stitch.

Then come up at E and make sure your thread is looped around the outside of your needle, then gently pull your thread tight.

Repeat until you’re happy with the length of your back stitch. Easy peasy, right!? 😁

Now that you know how to create the basic blanket stitch it’s time to get into the variations!

❤️ Long and Short Blanket Stitch

Before we dive into the next two stitches, the long and short blanket stitch and the uneven blanket stitch, it’s worth noting that you’ll sometimes see their names being used interchangeably and other times they’ll be called something else.

Don’t get too hung up on their names because it might confuse you. I know it did me when I first learned these two. For the sake of keeping this tutorial simple I’ll be using the names which were introduced to me when I became familiar with them.

To create the long and short blanket stitch you’ll do almost exactly as you did with the basic version.

The difference is the height of your stitch which will vary to create a scalloped look.

In my long and short blanket stitch there are 3 different heights but you can have more. My first stitch is about mid-height. The second one is just a bit longer. The third stitch is the longest.

From there you’ll repeat the second then first stitch so the stitches on each side of the longest stitch will be mirrored. Just repeat these steps until you’re happy!

Here’s a look at the basic version above the long and short version together so you can see the difference.

The spacing between the lines can be closer together or further apart, and the height of the lines can be whatever you really want it to be. Play around with spacing and height to see how it affects the design.

❤️ Uneven Blanket Stitch

The uneven blanket stitch is just like the long and short blanket stitch except this time you’ll only have 2 varying heights, one short and one tall, which alternate.

Just follow the same steps as the basic blanket stitch but alternate from short to long. Here’s my first short stitch.

See how each step alternates from short to long to short and so on…

Here are the three stitches you just learned so you can compare them.

While you can use these blanket stitches in your embroidery projects it’s also used to add a felt backing to your work when you’re finished.

You can also use them for felt appliqúe work as well which is super fun!

I’ll add a post in the near future with a fun project that you can download and follow along. 😁

❤️ Double Blanket Stitch

The double blanket stitch is just 2 basic blanket stitches with one on top and the other created just below it turned upside-down. It’s also slightly offset. You can use the same color thread or mix it up with contrasting colors for a fun effect!

The two sets can touch but they can also be set slightly away from each other. It really depends on what you’re going for.

❤️ German Knotted Blanket Stitch

Once again, start with one basic blanket stitch. Then, create another but this time stitch it a bit close to your first one.

Next, slip your needle under your two stitches, then pull your thread through to create a knot at the top.

And that is it! Repeat these steps until you’re happy with the length of your stitch.

❤️ Closed Blanket Stitch

The closed blanket stitch looks like a row of triangles which are all hanging on a line. While I think they’re super cute they also remind me of little monster teeth!

To get started, create your basic blanket stitch with a little variation.

When you come up at C it should be closer to A so it’s not directly above B. This will create an angle to help create the left side of our triangle.

To form the right side of your triangle, return to the back at B (keep thread slightly loose on top) then come up at D under your loose thread.

Sometimes, you’ll need your other hand to hold thread in place as you work so they don’t flop around or lose shape. It’s definitely helpful in this case.

Let’s create your 2nd closed blanket stitch. Return to the back at E then up at F to create the first side of your triangle. Remember, your thread should be on the outside of your needle.

Return to the back at E, keeping your thread loose on top.

Come up at G to create the second side of your triangle. Gently pull your thread tight.

Repeat until you you’re happy!

❤️ Crossed Blanket Stitch

In this variation we’ll be creating a row of X’s which are attached to each other.

Come up at A then down at B. Keep your thread slightly loose on top.

Just as we did in the closed blanket stitch come up at C so it’s a bit closer to A. Make sure the thread is on the outside of your needle.

Hold your thread down near C, then return to the back at D and keep the thread slightly loose on top.

Come up at E, and again your thread should be on the outside of your needle. At this point you should be able to see the X!

This variation is basically like creating the closed blanket stitch except you cross over to D instead of returning to the back at B to form your cross over.

Shall we try one more? 🙂

From E, return to the back at F. Then return to the front next to E to the right of the X.

Your thread should be on the outside of your needle. This is going to hold your stitch in place. If your needle is above your thread then your stitch will just flop over.

Return to the back at B while keeping the thread on top a bit loose. Then Return to the front at G, making sure the loose thread is looped over the needle to form your second X.

Repeat these steps until you’re happy with the length.

To end your stitch, you can add a little stitch at the top right or make it a little longer to mirror the beginning of your stitch.

❤️ Boxed Blanket Stitch

The boxed blanket stitch is a combination of the basic blanket stitch and the running stitch.

First create your basic blanket stitch. Make a row of them and then add your running stitch at every other open end to create little boxes. Super easy!

❤️ Whipped Blanket Stitch


This one is also a combination of two stitches… your basic blanket stitch and the whipped running stitch.

  • Create your row using the basic blanket stitch.
  • Next add a whipped stitch along the top.
  • A whipped stitch just slips the thread around your existing stitch like a spiral.
  • This stitch looks best when you use contrasting colors.

The next two variations are great for making flowers, textures, and design elements!

❤️ Pinwheel

The pinwheel is essentially the basic blanket stitch created around a central point instead of a line. I’ve drawn in a circle with a dot for the center to use as guides.

Start on the circle and come up at A. Return to the back at B (keep your thread slightly loose on top).

Then come up at C. Your loose thread should be on the outside of your needle.

Let’s repeat that. Return to the back at B. Then come up at D. Return to the back at B again, then come back up at E.

Each time you return to the back you’ll always do so at B, the center of your circle. Each time you return to the front you’ll do so along the circle.

Repeat these steps until you’ve created your pinwheel!

The pinwheel is super fun for creating design elements as well as flowers. It reminds me a bit of the center of a poppy flower!

❤️ Looped Blanket Flower Stitch

I think you’re really going to love this one!

While it’s not exactly a blanket stitch it kind of is since the steps are similar. Here’s we’ll be creating loose blanket stitches to create loops that overlap each other along several layers of circles to create a 3-dimensional flower.

I’ve quickly added a satin stitch to the center (you can use other stitches like the french knot), and I’ve also drawn in a few layers of circles around it where we’ll be adding our loopy stitches.

While you can start from the circle closest to the center and work your way out, it’s actually easier in my experience to start from the outside. You’ll be able to see what you’re doing better that way.

Let’s create our first little loop.

Come up at A then return to the back at B and create a little loop.

Return to the front between A and B, at C. Your loop should be on the outside of your needle.

Gently pull your needle and thread up so you don’t accidentally pull your loop to the back.

Next loop…

Just repeat what we did. Return to the back at D to create a little loop.

Return to the front at or next to B. Remember, your loop should be on the outside of your needle. Hold down your loops to keep them out of the way if need be.

Gently pull your needle and thread up so you don’t lose that loop.

Then from B, return to the back at E to create your 3rd loop.

Return to the front at D.

Once you’ve finished your first circle. Move on to the next circle and repeat until you’re reached the center of your flower. Fluff your petals at the very end.

Once finished, your flower will look like the one on the left. You can cut and trim the loops to get something like the one on the right! Should you cut the loops be really careful not to pull them out by accident.

❤️ Blanket Stitch Video Tutorial

Wow! We’re finally at the end!

You now know how to create the basic blanket stitch and you also know how to create variations of it for your stitching projects! If you want a little more help with them just watch my video tutorial below.

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❤️ Thanks for following along, and as always, happy stitching!